Learning patience is an ongoing process.  As a rookie business leader, it often appears as if it’s not even an option because we’re “too busy” dealing with real-time business challenges. But as you mature in your role, you will begin to notice patterns in so-called emergencies, and you will learn how well it can pay to exercise a little bit of patience.

I, as usual, learned this the hard way. I was always the guy with all the answers. In my late twenties, I prided myself on how knowledgeable I was in my industry. I had already dealt with so many challenges that there weren’t too many issues popping up that I hadn’t already conquered. When my business partners and staff consulted with me on a challenge or issue all I had to do was hear the gist of it before I spouted off how they had to deal with it in order to get a positive result.

At the time, I thought I was playing the role of a great leader, being available and on call at all hours of the day and night giving them the “Right Answers” and extra emotional strength to conquer their challenges.

How wrong I was and what a poor job I was doing in creating my next group of strong leaders. I know this now and it took many years of self-reflection and actually becoming a Behavioural Coach before I could know for sure where my leadership blind spots were.

Further on this topic, I want to offer some coaching mindset questions you can use with a dash of patience in order to help you and your people to learn and reflect on past challenges in hopes that the lessons learned can act as a modus operandi before your next big challenge rears its monstrous head.

⇒ What happened?

⇒ Why did it happen?

⇒ What story do you hold onto about the event?

⇒ What did you learn?

⇒ Has the event repeated itself but in another form or situation? If so, why do you think this is? If not, Do you think you would deal with the issue differently?

⇒ Do you feel that you have any influence or control over this particular situation?

⇒ Have you made any effort to fix or reduce the chances of this challenge happening again? If so, was it successful? If not, Why not?

⇒ Is there another point of view on this challenge?

⇒ What about the other parties involved, How do you think they view it?

⇒ What do you think is the best possible outcome for all parties from this challenge?

⇒ Was this reached? If not, is there something we can do about this today?

This is just a small list of reflective questions to get you started. There is no substitute for conscious reflective thinking and patiently working through various solutions with yourself, your staff and your coach or mentor if you have one or hopefully both.


“True wisdom is rightfully earned through diligent self-reflection and conscious daily actions” djk


Behavioral Coach
Dominic Kotarski is the author of international best-seller “The Making”. He writes, speaks, inspires, motivates and teaches on the most important aspects of your business including Sales, Coaching, Team-Building, People Management and Business Development. Get weekly access to his blog & training videos FREE by subscribing HERE! and when you sign up you will get Instant Access to his Sales Skills Training Video.  

For a FREE 30-minute coaching FIT consultation schedule HERE


 





Dominic Kotarski
Dominic Kotarski

Dominic Kotarski is an author, coach, sales trainer and Founder of Sales Success Academy. He's personally inspired, coached, trained and managed thousands of salespeople and business owners in 11 different countries. You can find him in Vancouver, Canada where he lives, works, runs, ski's and spends most of his free time with his family.

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    1 Response to "When You’re Ready"

    • […] When we face an immediate challenge our first thoughts spring from our training and conditioning. Our initial reaction stems from our cultural upbringing and role models that have personally influenced us. Our second thoughts, however, are derived from our own personal database of experience and gleaned wisdom. Our ability to tap into our second layer of thinking comes with a bit of practice and patience. […]

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